Steroid binding affinity

Masteron will significantly suppress natural testosterone production making exogenous testosterone therapy important when using this steroid. Failure to include exogenous testosterone will lead most men to a low testosterone condition, which not only comes with numerous possible symptoms but is also extremely unhealthy.

As most will use Masteron in a cutting cycle, it’s very common not to want to use a lot of testosterone due to the high levels of estrogenic activity it can provide. If this is the case, you will find a low dose of 100-200mg per week of testosterone to be enough to combat suppression and give you the needed testosterone.

Once Masteron is discontinued and all exogenous steroidal hormones have cleared your system, natural testosterone production will begin again. Prior levels will not return to normal over night, this will take several months. Due to the slow recovery, Post Cycle Therapy (PCT) plans are often recommended. This will speed up the recovery greatly; however, it won’t bring your levels back to their peak, this will still take time. A PCT plan will ensure you have enough testosterone for proper bodily function while your levels continue to naturally rise and significantly cut down on the total recovery time. This natural recovery does assume no prior low testosterone condition existed. It also assumes no damage was done to the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Testicular-Axis (HPTA) through improper supplementation practices.
 

Cells of the zona fasciculata and zona reticularis lack aldosterone synthase (CYP11B2) that converts corticosterone to aldosterone, and thus these tissues produce only the weak mineralocorticoid corticosterone. However, both these zones do contain the CYP17A1 missing in zona glomerulosa and thus produce the major glucocorticoid, cortisol. Zona fasciculata and zona reticularis cells also contain CYP17A1, whose 17,20-lyase activity is responsible for producing the androgens, dehydroepiandosterone (DHEA) and androstenedione. Thus, fasciculata and reticularis cells can make corticosteroids and the adrenal androgens, but not aldosterone.

Transdermal patches (adhesive patches placed on the skin) may also be used to deliver a steady dose through the skin and into the bloodstream. Testosterone-containing creams and gels that are applied daily to the skin are also available, but absorption is inefficient (roughly 10%, varying between individuals) and these treatments tend to be more expensive. Individuals who are especially physically active and/or bathe often may not be good candidates, since the medication can be washed off and may take up to six hours to be fully absorbed. There is also the risk that an intimate partner or child may come in contact with the application site and inadvertently dose himself or herself; children and women are highly sensitive to testosterone and can suffer unintended masculinization and health effects, even from small doses. Injection is the most common method used by individuals administering AAS for non-medical purposes. [45]

Steroid binding affinity

steroid binding affinity

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